What works--research and the police
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What works--research and the police by Kelling, George L.

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Justice, National Institute of Justice in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Police -- United States -- Police patrol.,
  • Police administration -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesResearch and the police.
Statementby George L. Kelling.
SeriesCrime file. Study guide, Crime file
ContributionsNational Institute of Justice (U.S.)
The Physical Object
Pagination[4] p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22394571M

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A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Some police departments continue initiating their own schemes, even when the program is fully developed. A program implemented in Detroit, for example, maintained a section of police‐initiated schemes in order to promote neighborhood watch in areas that were unlikely to generate public‐initiated requests (Turner and Barker, ).Cited by: • By police. • By criminal justice agencies after arrest. Crime prevention programs in each of these settings are legally eligible for Jus-tice Department crime prevention fund-ing. However, because Congress requires that most funding decisions about spe-cific programs be decentralized to State and local governments, no detailed.   On a recent trip to Miami, Endowment Director of Literary Arts Amy Stolls found herself at the city’s police headquarters. Home to a call center, offices for top brass, and an investigations department, Stolls was there “to talk about books,” as she told an officer who was directing visitors through the station’s corridors.

Modern police work: including detective duty: a book for police officers of all ranks / (New York: F.M. Basuino, c), by James Joseph Skehan (page images at HathiTrust) Special-purpose public police (Santa Monica, Calif., Rand, ), by James S Kakalik, Sorrel Wildhorn, and United States Department of Justice (page images at HathiTrust). Early Warning Systems for Police: Concept, History, and Issues (Samuel Walker, Geoffrey P. Alpert, and Dennis J. Kenney) Putting the "What Works" Research into Practice: An Organizational Perspective (Jennifer L. Ferguson) Criminal Justice System Reform and Wrongful Conviction: A Research Agenda (Marvin Zalman) How police officers should be trained and the level of education needed to deliver law enforcing and protective services to the public continues to be a matter of discussion, Where What Works research was consulted, hot spots research was the most frequently cited. Book Review: Hannah L.F. Cooper and Mindy Thompson Fullilove ().   Evidence-based policing (EBP) is an important strand of the UK’s College of Policing’s Police Education Qualifications Framework (PEQF), itself a component of a professionalisation agenda.

works cited for research paper New and behavioral statistics; journal of time and issue. Most of economic rights and videos on parents now sample mla practice and page date to find a research paper. Social Work Research publishes exemplary research to advance the development of knowledge and inform social work practice. Widely regarded as the outstanding journal in the field, it includes analytic reviews of research, theoretical articles pertaining to social work research, evaluation studies, and diverse research studies that contribute to knowledge about social work issues and problems.   Willis and Mastrofski () agree that the focus on what works research (whether by experimental EBP or crime science) has skewed research towards crime control. This is an important goal of the police, but their police officer informants draw attention to a much broader array of considerations, demanding sophistication in the moral reasoning Cited by: On a recent trip to Miami, Endowment Director of Literary Arts Amy Stolls found herself at the city’s police headquarters. Home to a call center, offices for top brass, and an investigations department, Stolls was there “to talk about books,” as she told an officer who was directing visitors.